Monthly Archives: May 2017

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NAMA maps out strategies to GO SOLAR.

The Nigerian Airspace Management Agency (NAMA) is switching to solar panels and batteries to boost its equipment, and also to reduce dependence on public power supply.

The equipment, which is valued at several millions of naira, would be deployed to eight locations in Lagos, Calabar, Enugu, Sokoto and four others.

An electrical engineer described that the move will provide alternative source of power to NAMA’s Instrument Landing Systems(ILSs) across the nation’s airports.

Anjorin said the equipment were captured in 2016 budget, and that they have commenced installation of the equipment at the Lagos and Kaduna airports.

He disclosed that the remaining batteries and solar panels are already included in the 2017 budget.

According to him, The batteries are more reliable to give 24 hours effectiveness. NAMA has done civil work at the stations and we are commencing installations this week. The idea is that next year, all our ILS and other essential equipment will be covered by Solar DC Direct.

All expenses on generators and maintenance will be reduced drastically, including air pollution. The greatest challenge we have is electricity. Our equipment is easily destroyed because of erratic power supply.

Director, Safety Electronics and Engineering of NAMA, Farouk Ahmed Umar, said the agency acquired an Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) to boost the autonomy of interrupted power supply.

He said: “Once there is light, it guarantees the improvement of the equipment. We are deploying them in other stations. This will stop blind spots in the airspace.”

Umar said the situation of blind spots is caused by constant power outage, stressing that when it happens, communication between pilots and air traffic controllers is limited, which he said takes some minutes before it is restored.

He stated that during this time, communication is very weak – what people termed as blind spots in the airspace.

He noted that this would correct the situation as it would boost and power the equipment for over 24 hours even when power to the system is lost.

Despite the total radar coverage of Nigeria, otherwise known as TRACON, the management of NAMA has mapped out strategies to end that which is caused by power fluctuation to its facilities.

The architectural design of TRACON consists of Voice Communication Systems (VCS), Voice Recording Systems (VRS), Very High Frequency Transceivers (VHFT), Fiber Optic, Display Consoles, Integrated Aircraft Billing Systems (IABS) and spares while radars at the international airports comprise both primary and secondary radars.

Umar said Radio Frequency 127.3mhz has an improved range and is working perfectly just as the Radio Frequency 124.7 mhz is also in good condition and both are on presently.

It will be recalled thaat recently, the Managing Director of NAMA, Capt. Fola Akinkuotu, gave assurance that the era of flight disruptions occasioned by harmattan or inclement weather would be a thing of the past as the Federal Government had concluded plans to install multi-million-dollar Instrument Landing Systems (ILS) in 11 airports across the country.

He admitted that visibility at many of the aerodromes is bad during harmattan, but gave assurance that with operable ILS to go to the aerodromes, “come December this year, there should be no excuse of them not landing in harmattan.”

Among the airports to benefit from the critical safety tools are those in Lagos, Port-Harcourt, Ibadan, Benin, Abuja and Minna, apart from Kaduna, which has brand new safety tools.

He said, “There are 11 ILSs that are going to be installed. They are brand new. Don’t let us forget that they are going to recover some items. Lagos has an ILS; I think Ibadan too is going to get newer ones. So, whatever we recover, we can put them in some other places.
I would expect that over time when the materials, assets are in, we should be able to do not less than 18 fields.”

Although, Akinkuotu was silent on the cost of the instrument, aggregating the numbers from several quarters, getting a Category II/III system up and running these days would cost at least $3 million per runway, plus at least $10,000 or so per year just to keep it certified. -Thenews

 


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Solar energy & its abundant sun light.

To protect the environment and reduce dependence on fossil fuel, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) has advocated the promotion of clean energy concept among secondary school students.


The group also expressed the need for unity among stakeholders in encouraging environmental conservation, investment in clean energy and the recognition of the role of children in promoting sustainability agenda.
NCF Director General, Adeniyi Karunwi made the submission at the 2017 Grand finale of energy week organized by the Foundation in partnership with Skangix Development Limited for 31 private and public schools within the Lagos State Education Board District III.
Speaking on theme: “Energy make it nature friendly” he observed that fluctuating power supply has affected the nation’s productivity making it difficult to attract foreign investors while local investors are facing a lot of losses in revenues due to perennial Power challenges noting that Nigeria must take advantage of advancement in technology as the lasting solution.
“It is in realization of the aforementioned that NCF and its partners advocate the possibility of a Nigeria where people live in harmony with nature by encouraging environmental conservation, investment in clean and renewable energy, subsidize dirty fossil of the past”, he stated.
The guest speaker backed the use of solar due to its benefits such as durability, clean and green, low cost of maintenance, safe, reliable and affordability among others.
Aromolaran advised government to invest hugely in solar to relief government of its responsibility of providing the citizens power. He informed that energy agenda must be included in the nation’s political space as it is a condition for wealth for the country.
“There is no significant improvement in the adoption of the concept by African s including Nigeria while countries that use it experience incremental growth. Nigeria should be exporting solar energy with its abundant sun light. In 20years time, if Nigeria does not adopt solar on a large scale, we going to have ourselves to blame”, he warned.
On affordability of solar as an alternative source of power, he explained that by forging partnership with the public and private sector, communal partnership among communities, the prohibitive cost could be cut down via economics of scale and government making larger hectares of land available for the project. He stated further that the bigger the space and solar panels, the bigger the volume of energy that could be generated if the right attitude is deployed.
The second speaker spoke on the performance of the students in the competition. He informed participant that the brilliant standard of performance put up by the pupils demonstrated the slow but steady growth and awareness of the society in the realization of the importance of solar as a source of energy for Nigerians.
The Grand finally of the competition also featured presentations of certificate to participants, the first, second, and the third runners up in the Junior and senior secondary school categories, as well as awards to partnered organizations.
Source: The Guardian


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France to top all roofs with solar power or plants.

Can we all emulate this in Nigeria? A new law recently passed in France mandates that all new buildings that are built in commercial zones in France must be partially covered in either plants or solar panels.

Green roofs, as they are called, have an isolating effect which helps to reduce the amount of energy needed to heat a building during the winter or cool it in the summer.

They are capable of retaining rainwater and reducing problems with runoff, and also offer birds a place to call home in the urban jungle.

French environmental activists originally wanted to pass a law that would make the green roofs cover the entire surface of all new roofs. However, partially covered roofs make for a great start, and are still a huge step in the right direction.

Some say the law that was passed is actually better, as it gives the business owners a chance to install solar panels to help provide the buildings with renewable energy, thereby leaving even less of a footprint.

Green roofs are already very popular in Germany and Australia, as well as Canada’s city of Toronto! This by-law was adopted in 2009, by the city of Toronto which mandated green roofs on all new industrial and residential buildings.

France is definitely on the right track, but it should be a mandate that all new buildings being built in North America, and even worldwide, adopt this amazing idea to reap all of the potential benefits.  by Liam S. Whittaker

 


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No hope for Nigeria Power Sector -Senate.

Now is the time to invest in solar power. The Nigeria Senate had a critical talk and review of the progress made after privatization of the Power Sector following a debate and discussions on a motion moved by Senator Dino Melaye (APC Kogi West), entitled “DISCOs, electricity consumers and the burden of over-billing.”

AS the Senate began discussions on the power sector in Nigeria, yesterday, a very gloomy picture was painted by senators who concluded that there was no hope of Nigeria coming out of its present power crisis.

The Senate, which noted that the power sector was in dire need of emergency response, said Nigerians would not have steady power supply because the distribution companies were bankrupt and could not, therefore, procure meters.

Consequently, the upper chamber asked that the privatization of the sector be revisited without delay.
Senate chamber

Melaye, in his motion, said the burden of over-billing shouldered by electricity consumers in the country, even in the face of epileptic power supply by Distribution Companies, DISCOs, was totally unacceptable.

He also urged the Senate to mandate the Committee on Power to look into the astronomical electricity billing by DISCOs across the country and asked the Senate to urge the National Electricity Regulatory Commission, NERC, to call DISCOS to stop forthwith the practice of estimated billing.

  • As Daily Electricity Generation rises to 4, 197.50 MW

Melaye had at plenary on Tuesday, promised to present the motion after drawing the attention of senators to the exorbitant estimated billings being forced on consumers by the DISCOs.

In his contribution, Senator Ben Murray- Bruce, PDP, Bayelsa East, made it clear that with the manner the privatisation was carried out, operators in the power sector, such as DISCOs, were in serious difficulty.

Therefore, he recommended that the Senate prevailed on government to revisit the privatization.

Murray-Bruce, who declared that Nigerians have a catastrophe in their hands as far as the sector was concerned, said those currently running the sector were technically deficient due to a lot of factors not envisaged at the time the privatization was executed.

He said:  “They are technically bankrupt, unless we revisit the entire privatization process, unless we understand and dissect what went wrong, we will still get estimated billing.

“We have a catastrophe on our hands, there will be no power in Nigeria until the current structure is reviewed.

“Those who privatized the sector did not imagine that naira will be devalued from N160 to about N400 now. Those who invested in the business thought it was like a company where they will make a lot of money.

‘’I believe they only had enough money to pay the federal government and make the initial investment; they did not have the capacity to run a power sector company in a modern economy.”

In his contribution, Senator Mustapha Bukar, APC, Katsina North, while lamenting the ugly situation of the power sector, said that going by realities on ground in the sector, the country was sitting on an emergency without any sign of immediate solution.

According to him, though the nation has capacity for generation over 12,000mega watts, only 4,000mw    have been achieved at any time, out of which 1,800mw are paid for by consumers, making the providers to be in perpetual indebtedness.

Senator Bukar, who is the Deputy Chairman, Senate Committee on Power, said: “The problem we have is the inefficiency within the system which we have actually so far not decided to address.

‘’ I will give you a small example: Nigeria has an installed capacity of 12,522 Megawatts of power. We have non-available capacity of 5,300; we have non-operational capacity of 3,180; meaning that the amount that is actually available is just over 4,000 Megawatts out of 12,500.

“We have transmission loss of 228, we have distribution loss of 447 Megawatts. At the end of the day, only 3,800 Megawatts reach the consumer. And we have commercial loss of more than 36 percent.

“So, what is actually being paid for out of the over 3,000 Megawatts is only 1,800 Megawatts. So unless and until we decide to look at these inefficiency within the value chain, there is no way we can have better electricity generation, distribution and also billing system in the country.

‘’So, I agree that the model they have used for privatisation has not worked. And unless and until this inefficiency is looked at, it will not work.

“If we have capacity to generate 4,500 Megawatts but we can only get less than 4,000, that is more than 75 percent of the capacity is not ulltilised. It means that we are sitting on an emergency has to be attended to drastically to address this problem.

‘’The value chain is weakest at the DISCOs because they are the ones who collect the money. And you never know how much money is being collected because they have failed to install the metres that are needed. We need millions of metres.”

Chairman Senate Committee on Power, Enyinnaya Abaribe, told the Senate that a report on the matter was waiting to be laid, and requested that further debate on the matter be suspended until the details of his committee findings were considered.

The Senate accepted Abaribe’s prayers. Source; energywatchng

 


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The world’s largest floating solar power plant just went online in China.

Solar power plants could boost Nigeria power sector even beyond expectations. China has announced that the largest floating photovoltaic (PV) facility on earth has finally been completed and connected to the local power grid.

Long reviled for its carbon emission record, this is the Chinese government’s latest achievement in its ongoing effort to lead the world in renewable energy adoption.

Located in the city of Huainan in the Anhui province, the 40-megawatt facility was created by PV inverter manufacturer. Ironically, the floating grid itself was constructed over a flooded former coal-mining region.

Floating solar farms are becoming increasingly popular around the world because their unique design addresses multiple efficiency and city planning issues. These floating apparatuses free up land in more populated areas and also reduce water evaporation.

The cooler air at the surface also helps to minimize the risk of solar cell performance atrophy, which is often related to long-term exposure to warmer temperatures.

This is just the first of many solar energy operations popping up around China. In 2016, the country unveiled a similar 20MW floating facility in the same area. China is also home to the Longyangxia Dam Solar Park, a massive 10-square-mile, land-based facility touted as the largest solar power plant on earth.

This transition to solar is in large part due to the rapidly plummeting cost of the technology itself. By 2020, China could reduce prices offered to PV developers by more than a third with solar power plants projected to rival coal facilities within a decade. The nation has also announced plans to increase its use of non-fissile fuel energy sources by 20 percent.

An annual report released by NASA and NOAA determined that 2016 was the warmest year on record globally, marking the third year in a row in which a new record was set for global average surface temperatures. That said, if we as a species hope to reverse this dire trend, initiatives like this and others will need to be adopted around the globe

 


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Where is your Money best spent?

Energy efficiency is always the most affordable and environmentally sound place to start when approaching renewable energy. Experts estimate that for every naira you spend on efficiency improvements, you can save N3 on the long run. So where is your money best spent?

With the steady increase in electricity tariff and cost of fuel, it becomes imperative to invest in solar power systems. You will be  saving thousands of naira in electricity bills which can be put to good use with other things

You can tremendously reduce your electricity bill by having an energy-efficient household this means reducing your energy consumption by using efficient appliance and energy-savings strategies. An example is to swap out incandescent lightbulbs with compact fluorescents (CFs) or LEDs, and boosting insulation levels in your home.

A 2009 study by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory identified seven major household energy uses:

  • Space Heating—29%
  • Space Cooling—17%
  • Water Heating—14%
  • Appliances—13%
  • Lighting—12%
  • Other (stoves, ovens, microwaves, coffee makers, dehumidifiers)—11%
  • Electronics (computers, monitors, DVD players, TVs)—4%

Recommendation on energy conservation

  • Energy conservation works together with efficiency, changing your energy-use behaviors (for example, turning off the lights when you leave a room, or adjusting the temperature of the air condition at night). Apply the basic principles of conservation and efficiency to all of your energy choices.
  • Since space heating and cooling take such big bites out of the energy pie and in turn your energy bill, Energywatchng recommends improvement in your home’s insulation and reducing air infiltration can be a smart first strategy. Sealing draft-prone areas, the points at which dissimilar building materials converge or the building envelope is penetrated, reduces uncontrolled air infiltration. Combine this with increased insulation, and upgraded window and doors, and you can reduce the amount of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning needed to sustain a comfortable household temperature throughout the year. Passive strategies, such as solar retrofits, movable shading devices, and/or strategically placed landscaping, can also provide energy-saving benefits when it comes to heating and cooling your home.
  • Some strides have been made in more efficient water heating, including better-insulated tank-style heaters (both gas and electric) and the much newer “hybrid” water heaters that feature heat-pump technology. For retrofit situations, consider adding extra insulation to your pipes and tanks to reduce energy losses. Solar hot water systems can also drastically improve a home’s water-heating efficiency, cutting your water-heating bills by 40% to 80%.
  • Upgrading to energy-efficient appliances and electronics can greatly improve your household’s energy efficiency. From LED lamps to horizontal-axis washing machines, many gains have been made in reducing energy use.  Most especially your appliances you run longer like your TVs, refrigerator etc.
  • Higher-efficiency lighting—mostly in the form of LED lamps—has begun to enter the mainstream, with quality bulbs readily available. Compared to their incandescent counterparts, LED lamps use one-tenth of the energy and last up to 40 times as long. They contain none of the hazardous mercury present in compact fluorescent (CF) bulbs, but are more expensive than CFs.
  • Last but not least, you can identify the energy-wasters—known as phantom loads—in your home. Unfortunately, many household electronics—even when “off”—constantly draw energy. Unplugging them, putting them on plug strips that can be switched off, or using dedicated switches can defeat these phantom loads and provide additional energy savings.

Source: Iwin


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Here Comes The Sun

Category : Alternative Energy

HERE COME’S THE SUN

Solar energy is really our only answer for long-term sustainable energy

Humans consume 221 tonnes of coal, 1,066 barrels of oil, and 93,000 metric cubes of natural gas per second. The Conversation

These materials were wonderful for the industrial revolution that started in Britain in the 18th century and made use of “new energy” sources such as coal and petroleum. At the start of the 21st century, however, it’s time to reassess the notion of “new energy”. Fossil fuels have no place in any long-term sustainable energy solution for the planet. It needs to be replaced with renewable energy sources. But which ones?

Sooner or later humanity needs to get its head around the fact that the only long-term sustainable energy solution is solar energy. This is simply borne out by the immense amount of energy potential that the sun can provide versus any other renewable resource such as wind, nuclear, biomass or geothermal. To place that in perspective: the theoretical potential of solar power is 89 terawatts (TW), which represents more energy striking the Earth’s surface in 90 minutes (480 Exajoules, EJ) than the worldwide energy consumption for the entire year 2001 (430 EJ) from all other resources combined.

 Off-grid solar should be Africa’s energy future. Off-grid solar should be Africa’s energy future. Off-grid simply means a system where people don’t rely on the support of remote infrastructure, like connectivity to a centralised electricity transmission line, but instead use a stand-alone independent power supply. Such systems are perfect for people living in rural areas. Access to energy should be a basic human right for the 620 million people across Africa deprived from it. To achieve this, one should look beyond the grid for future power solutions.

In my years of teaching an advanced level sustainable energy course, it’s clear that the ‘sustainable energy’ solution requires a multidisciplinary approach and needs expertise from the fields of chemistry, biophysics, biology and materials engineering.

For example, photosynthesis is nature’s solution to sustain life and its complete understanding touches many disciplines. Can science learn from it to provide a sustainable energy solution? Yes, through a process called artificial photosynthesis. Large-scale photovoltaic (PV) panels dot the landscape in solar farms. Can we imagine transparent solar cells with the look of glass that can be brought to the city? The answer is yes.

Say yes to the sun

Energy is the most important resource for humanity and solar energy is the ultimate energy source. The sun as a solar energy source has a number of advantages: it is abundant, it is essentially inexhaustible, and it doesn’t discriminate but provides equal access to all users.

 Let us not repeat the deadly sins of considering nuclear power as an option. Earth presently consumes energy at a rate of about 17.7 trillion watts (17 terawatt, TW), that would reach 30 TW by 2050 assuming a similar population growth rate. The solar energy irradiating the surface of the Earth is almost four orders of magnitude larger than the rate our civilisation can consume it. This is obviously more than sufficient if harnessed properly.

The energy potential of the sun is 120,000 TW at earth surface. More practically, assuming that only 10% efficiency and covering less than 2% of earth surface would get us 50 TW;

  • Wind is at 2-4 TW at 10 meters;
  • nuclear 8 TW, build one plant every 1.5 days forever – due to decommissioning;
  • biomass 5-7 TW, all cultivatable land not used for food;
  • geothermal 12 TW.

The solution should thus be clear: focus on the sun, nothing else gets the required numbers. The solar and wind duo has been considered a viable option at least for Africa’s future. The challenge is that solar energy only becomes useful once it’s converted into usable energy forms like heat, electricity, and fuels.

Below are two state-of-the-art new technologies that convert solar energy into electricity or fuels.

New technologies

Black solar photovoltaic (PV) panels are the most familiar to generate electricity. A game changer will be a new technology where such PV panels are transparent. This could then replace regular glass, wherever one finds glass. For example, on large buildings, the vertical “glass panels” can literally become the source that powers the building.

The solar company Onyx Solar has already demonstrated proof-of-concept by applying PV glass for buildings in 70 projects and in 25 different countries. Its only current competitor, Ubiquitous Energy focuses more on mobile devices. On a mobile phone, the glass screen will become the power source, potentially making batteries redundant.

In simplest terms, photosynthesis is a process where green plants use the energy in sunlight to carry out chemical reactions. One such reaction is to break water molecules into its constituent parts of oxygen and hydrogen.

Artificial photosynthesis is a process that mimics parts of natural photosynthesis to suit our needs, like forming hydrogen. And because hydrogen is considered the fuel of the future, a large research focus is to capture and convert sunlight into energy with storage of hydrogen.

In South Africa, the nuclear energy landscape has been tainted by political greed, rather than scientific reasoning. Fortunately, in April 2017 all further developments for a nuclear future were halted by a high court.Say no to nuclear energy

Let us not repeat the deadly sins of considering nuclear power as an option, but remind ourselves of two consequences.

  1. It takes 10 years and billions of rand to commission a nuclear power station, let alone eight. Once commissioned, such stations don’t last forever, but after 50 years has to be decommissioned again, costing the same amount in time and fiscal.
  2. Suppose South Africa is a country with stockpiles of enriched uranium and nuclear plants, such utilities become primary targets for terrorists and are expensive to safeguard. Why even take the risk?

It’s now 31 years since the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It devastated Ukraine and the 2,600 square kilometres of surrounding land is still considered unsuitable for humans.

A colossal radiation shield is now concealing the stain on that landscape. Is such a risk worth it for South Africa when the sun has so much potential?

Werner van Zyl, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Lecturer in sustainable energy, University of KwaZulu-Natal

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


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The only long-term sustainable energy solution is solar energy; Say Yes to the Sun!!

Solar energy is really our only answer for long-term sustainable energy. Humans consume 221 tons of coal, 1,066 barrels of oil, and 93,000 metric cubes of natural gas per second. 

 

These materials were wonderful for the industrial revolution that started in Britain in the 18th century and made use of “new energy” sources such as coal and petroleum. At the start of the 21st century, however, it’s time to reassess the notion of “new energy”. Fossil fuels have no place in any long-term sustainable energy solution for the planet. It needs to be replaced with renewable energy sources. But which ones?

Sooner or later humanity needs to get its head around the fact that the only long-term sustainable energy solution is solar energy. This is simply borne out by the immense amount of energy potential that the sun can provide versus any other renewable resource such as wind, nuclear, biomass or geothermal. To place that in perspective: the theoretical potential of solar power is 89 terawatts (TW), which represents more energy striking the Earth’s surface in 90 minutes (480 Exajoules, EJ) than the worldwide energy consumption for the entire year 2001 (430 EJ) from all other resources combined.

Off-grid solar should be Africa’s energy future. Off-grid simply means a system where people don’t rely on the support of remote infrastructure, like connectivity to a centralised electricity transmission line, but instead use a stand-alone independent power supply. Such systems are perfect for people living in rural areas. Access to energy should be a basic human right for the 620 million people across Africa deprived from it. To achieve this, one should look beyond the grid for future power solutions.

In my years of teaching an advanced level sustainable energy course, it’s clear that the ‘sustainable energy’ solution requires a multidisciplinary approach and needs expertise from the fields of chemistry, biophysics, biology and materials engineering.

For example, photosynthesis is nature’s solution to sustain life and its complete understanding touches many disciplines. Can science learn from it to provide a sustainable energy solution? Yes, through a process called artificial photosynthesis. Large-scale photovoltaic (PV) panels dot the landscape in solar farms. Can we imagine transparent solar cells with the look of glass that can be brought to the city? The answer is yes.

Energy is the most important resource for humanity and solar energy is the ultimate energy source. The sun as a solar energy source has a number of advantages: it is abundant, it is essentially inexhaustible, and it doesn’t discriminate but provides equal access to all users.

The energy potential of the sun is 120,000 TW at earth surface. More practically, assuming that only 10% efficiency and covering less than 2% of earth surface would get us 50 TW

The solution should thus be clear:Lets  focus on the sun, nothing else gets the required numbers. The solar and wind duo has been considered a viable option at least for Africa’s future. The challenge is that solar energy only becomes useful once it’s harnnessed and converted into usable energy forms like heat, electricity.  Written by Werner van Zyl, University of KwaZulu-Nata


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Diesel causes 38,000 Premature Death Annually.

Solar energy gains more popularity as study by the Environmental Health Analytics, LLC revealed that diesel exhaust gasses can be linked to 38,000 early deaths worldwide most especially in Africa. If action isn’t taken, this figure will be climbing as high as an annual death rate of 183,600 in 23 years.

A key problem in both measuring and regulating exhaust is the abuse of the testing system by manufacturers such as Volkswagen.

Researcher Daven Henze from the University of Colorado, said in an interview for a press release “It shows that in addition to tightening emissions standards, we need to be attaining the standards that already exist in real-world driving conditions.”

The new research is the latest in a long series of damning studies that have highlighted the problem of greenhouse gas emissions. Earlier this year the World Health Organization (WHO) found that a quarter of the deaths of children under the age of five are attributable to pollution — that’s 1.7 million deaths a year. The WHO also found in 2014 that seven million deaths a year were caused by outdoor air pollution.

Humans are not the only ones paying a price for pollution. It was shown recently that climate change caused by car emissions disturbs the seasonal clock of nine species of North American song birds.

Recently, though, breakthroughs have been made in environmentally friendly technology. Elon Musk has encouraged a crusade against carbon emissions by stating at the World Energy Innovation Forum in 2016 that “We need a revolt against the fossil fuel industry.” He has reinforced his convictions by ramping up production for solar panels to meet African country’s needs.  These advances in renewable energy technology could not only save the environment, but hundreds of thousands of lives as well.

 

 


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Do you know why our solar systems are doing so well in 13 states & the F.C.T?

AWPS Renewable Energy Ltd has made some truly remarkable discoveries in providing premium quality solar power, and one extremely important lesson has been the importance of grounding our solar power systems. This is why we are different from every other competitor out there. We have installed and commissioned over 60 solar power projects in 13 states and the F.C.T. Apart from the quality inverters and batteries we offer for our installations, another reason why all our installations are performing wonderfully well in your state or area is because we earth them.

How we always pound the earth rod into the ground

Electricity has provided countless benefits to people, but it remains one of the deadliest elements readily available in our daily lives. Unless you have already grounded your systems, you are taking a rather large risk by not doing so.

In an electrical circuit, there is what’s known as an active wire, which supplies the power, and a neutral wire, which carries that current back. An extra ‘grounding wire’ can be attached to outlets and other electrical devices and securely connected to the ground at the breaker box. This ground wire is an additional path for electric current to return safely to the ground without danger to anyone in the event of a short circuit.

Our systems are installed in such a way that If a short circuit did occur, the current would flow through the ground wire, causing a blown fuse or tripped circuit breaker – an outcome much preferable than the fatal shock that could result if the current was not grounded.

Here are 5 main reasons why we ground our solar power systems

One of the most important reasons we ground our systems is that it protects your appliances, your home and everyone in it from surges in electricity. If lightning was to strike or the power was to surge at your place for whatever reason, this produces dangerously high voltages of electricity in your system. If your electrical system is grounded, all that excess electricity will go into the earth — rather than frying everything connected to your system

Having your solar power system grounded means you will be making it easy for power to be directed straight to wherever you need it, allowing electrical currents to safely and efficiently travel throughout your electrical system.

A grounded solar power system also makes it easier for the right amount of power to be distributed to all the right places, which can play a huge role in helping to ensure circuits aren’t overloaded and blown. The earth provides a common reference point for the many voltage sources in an electrical system.

Another reason why we ground our systems is to keep you safe because the earth is such a great conductor, and because excess electricity will always take the path of least resistance. By grounding your electrical system, you are giving it somewhere to go other than into you – possibly saving your life.

Without a properly grounded solar power systems, you are risking any appliances you have connected to your system being fried beyond repair. In the worst-case scenario, an overload of power can even cause a fire to start, risking not just extensive property and data loss but physical injury as well.

Grounding your solar system is a smart and easy way to make it a lot safer, as well as to protect against the very real possibility of having to deal with fluctuations in power supply. If you want to safeguard all your important assets, whether at home or at the office, as well as look out for the health and safety of everyone around you, find out if your solar power system is grounded and if it is not, you can contact AWPS Renewable Energy Ltd, Nigeria’s #1 provider of premium quality for a professionally designed solar power system for your home and business.  WE DO SOLAR POWER RIGHT!